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Where to buy our honey

12/06/2019

 Our honey is for sale at Three Mile Ridge Country Store. It's in Lethbridge on Highway 230 on the Bonavista Peninsula.  You can't miss it when travelling from the Trans-Canada Highway to Trinity or Bonavista.

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12/06/2019

Four Cousins Honey is a proud supporter of the Newfoundland and Labrador Beekeeping Association.

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Terroir

 

Photo P. ArmitagePhoto P. ArmitageA relatively recent borrowing from French, the word Terroir  may be a pompous term to the ears of many English-speakers.  However, it’s a common-place term in French-speaking parts of Europe. It refers to all the environmental factors that affect a crop’s characteristics including its flavour.  It fits honey very well, because the taste and colour of our honey are greatly affected by the type of flowers we have around our bee yards. Moreover, our honey tastes different from one year to the next depending on what the dominant floral species are in any given year, whether there's been a drought that affected the nectar flow at any point during the summer, and other factors.  Our honey is from the Portland-Brookland-Lethbridge terroir on the Bonavista Peninsula of Newfoundland.

 

 Photo P. ArmitagePhoto P. Armitage“Over the centuries, French winemakers developed the concept of terroir by observing the differences in wines from different regions, vineyards, or even different sections of the same vineyard. The French began to crystallize the concept of terroir as a way of describing the unique aspects of a place that influence and shape the wine made from it. Long before the French, the wine-making regions of the ancient world had already developed a concept of different regions having the potential to produce very different and distinct wines, even from the same grapes. The Ancient Greeks would stamp amphorae with the seal of the region they came from, and soon different regions established reputations based on the quality of their wines. For centuries, literate and disciplined members of the Benedictine and Cistercian orders cultivated grapes in much of Burgundy.  With vast landholdings, the monks could conduct large-scale observation of the influences that various parcels of land had on the wine it produced. Some legends have the monks going as far as "tasting" the soil. Over time the monks compiled their observations and began to establish the boundaries of different terroirs - many of which still exist today as the Grand Cru vineyards  of Burgundy” ― Source Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terroir

 


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